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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but there is an international effort under way to work on a cease-fire. egypt has been taking the lead role, and today the egyptian president, along with representatives from qatar and turkey, held talks in cairo with hamas' leader in exile. the israelis call him a terrorist, but so far, they haven't object the to the egyptians' efforts. margaret. >> brennan: allen pizzey in tel aviv. thank you. for more on the gaza conflict we're joined in washington by our senior national security analyst, juan zarate. juan, good evening. >> good evening, margaret. >> brennan: what exactly is egypt trying to accomplish? >> well, egypt is trying to broker a cease-fire here. they want the violence to stop. they also want to demonstrate that they can serve as a regional power, they can bring peace, and for the sake of president morsi and the muslem brotherhood running egypt they want to consolidate power and get the economy running. they don't want a war to be starting on their doorstep at a time when they are not in full control in cairo. >> reporter: egypt and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what k
to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike
violent protests in egypt since its new president came to power. the clashes sparked by mohamed morsi's move to grant himself sweeping powers. cbs reporter tara mergener tells us, at the same time, a shooting incident on the gaza- israel border has not caused a break in that fragile cease- fire. >> reporter: palestinians matched marched through the streets to bury a man shot on friday. he died when israeli troops opened fire on the gaza border. the israeli military says about 300 palestinians tried to breach the security fence at different points. so far, the incident hasn't compromised the two-day old cease-fire between israel and hamas. it was a common seen on gaza and egypt where two crossings are opened again. they closed when the fighting broke out. now palestinians can once again travel to egypt. egypt's president earned high praise from the u.s. for leading cease-fire negotiations. but now he is facing a backlash from his own people for trying to expand his powers. [ non-english language ] >> reporter: the egyptian president's spokesman announced on television that the presiden
to sit down with egypt's president. and it's really important for secretary clinton to do her best to try to broker some kind of peace deal along with the rest of the international community. they are very concerned about the violence spilling into other areas of the region and we know right now it's very volatile there not only in what's happening in israel and in gaza but also in syria and egypt and in lebanon, frank. >> now, the u.s. government has a strong stand against hamas. so who will meet with the hamas leaders to broker the peace deal? >> reporter: that's egypt's president right now. mohamed morsi has been meeting with hamas. of course, the united states won't sit down with hamas leaders because they have not renounced terrorism. so that complicates the situation even further. but egypt has stepped up to try to broker this peace deal. there was word that there would be an announcement of some type of temporary truce a 24-hour cooling-off period this afternoon. we haven't heard anything yet. but the international community scrambling right now at this hour to try to find a way to
, i'm jeff glor. the turmoil in egypt turned deadly today, continuing fallout from president mohammed morsi's sweeping expansion of his powers on thursday when he said courts can no longer review his decisions. here is the latest. one person was killed and 60 hurt in a clash at a muslim brotherhood office. president morsi meets the top judges who oppose his move tomorrow. both sides plan major demonstrations on tuesday. we begin with holly williams in cairo. >> reporter: there were running street battles in central cairo today as protestors angry with president morsi clashed with the police. they fought with rocks and tear gas canisters in chaotic themes but without either side gaining very much ground. on tahrir square the home of last year's egyptian revolution peaceful protestors are staging a sit-in. they've set up camp and say they will stay until the president rescinds the decree that gave him sweeping new powers. their banner demands an egypt for all egyptians. but less than a year after its transition to democracy this country looks increasingly divided. president morsi reiter
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
deduction. dean reynolds will tell us more about this later in the broadcast. that crisis in egypt is growing tonight. more than 200,000 protesters have filled cairo's tahrir square. they are angry with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been vio
today. >> charlie d'agata in gaza city, thanks. >>> there's new pressure for egypt to step up and negotiate an end to the current round of fighting. this morning there are conflicting reports out of cairo that israel and gaza could be close to a truce. clarissa ward is in the egyptian capital. good morning, clarissa. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. the egyptian president morsi has said repeatedly he hopes to announce a cease-fire agreement imminently. but cbs news has spoken to a source very close to the hamas delegation here in cairo. they said that so far these talks are not going anywhere. now, one of the reasons for that may be that hamas is making some pretty big demands in exchange for stopping its rocket attacks on israel. primarily it wants an end to the israeli blockade of the gaza strip. israel unlikely to budge on that issue because of fears that lifting the blockade would lead to an influx of weapons that could get into the hands of militants inside gaza. as you said, u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon is on his way to cairo now for talks as diplomati
will total $2 billion. reporting live in walnut creek, don knapp, cbs 5. in egypt today, a prominent opposition leader accused president morsi of giving himself the powers of a pharaoh. they called the expansion of his powers an unprecedented attack on judicial independence. >> reporter: the protests continued today in egypt, though they were much smaller than yesterday. egyptians who believe that president mohammed morsi has made a brazen power grab clashed with authorities. but many supported president morsi's expanded role. the spokesperson says it's temporary and not democrat because mr. morsi won 52% of the vote in the presidential election. >> it's everywhere. democracy is, of course -- after the election, it's over. they would all have to wait for years for the one who is elected to president till he proves whether he will succeed for not. >> reporter: but no american president has ever controlled the legislative and executive blanches of government, then made himself immune to judicial oversight. it's that consolidation of power that makes some egyptians not only angry but fe
that was incorrect. that there was no protest or demonstration in benghazi. >>> overseas now in egypt the largest crowd yet have turned out to demonstrate against president morsi's declaration of wide ranging new powers. hundreds of thousands of protesters in cairo's tahrir square screamed for morsi to leave. another mass rally is planned for friday. today the cabinet meets to discuss the crisis. holly williams is in cairo with more. good morning. we saw a big escalation in these protests yesterday. what happened in tahrir square overnight and then again this morning? >> reporter: good morning. well the crowds are dispersed now but yesterday we saw scenes that were reminiscent of the egyptian revolution of two years ago. at tahrir square which you can see behind me the birth place of that revolution was carpeted in tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction. they even chanted the same slogan they chanted during the revolution the people want the downfall of the regime. this time the target of their anger is not the old dictatorship but the country's first elected president, mo
to be lifted. a few sticking points raised with that one. >> what does the role that egypt played mean for egypt and the region going forward? >> reporter: egypt has definitely emerged as the winner in all of this. secretary of state clinton calling it a cornerstone of stability in the region. and i think the west had been a little bit concerned about how egypt's recently elected islamist government would handle a situation like this. they did seem to strike a balance between appeasing their muslim brotherhood supporters who wanted them to talk tough with israel while making sure there's no chance of jeopardy jeopardizing that 32-year-old peace treaty with israel and, of course, the $1.5 billion in u.s. annual aid that comes attached to that treaty. >> clarissa ward thank you. >>> we now go to margaret brennan in washington where she is learning more about the united states' role in the cease fire deal. >> good morning to you charlie, and to gayle. u.s. and israeli officials say u.s. president obama sealed the deal with benjamin netanyahu but hillary clinton deliv
. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstration there on saturday. that could spark violent clashes. holly williams, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians a non-member observer status is opposed by the united states and israel. >> reporter: good morning. that vote wi
:30, widespread protests in egypt. the clashes sparked by the egyptian president's move to grant himself sweeping powers. >>> and just across the border, the cease-fire agreement between israel and gaza is holding despite a shooting incident on the border. and as cbs reporter tara mergener tells us, egypt's new president is getting praise for helping to broker the deal but his own people are not too happy about it. >> reporter: palestinians matched marched through the streets to bury a man shot on friday. chanting god is great and death to israel. he died when israeli troops opened fire on the gaza border. the israeli military says about 300 palestinians tried to breach the security fence at different points. so far, the incident hasn't compromised the two-day old cease-fire between israel and hamas. it was a come mer seen on gaza and egypt where two crossings were opened again. they closed when the fighting broke out. now palestinians can once again travel to egypt. egypt's president earned high praise from the u.s. for leading cease-fire negotiations. but now he is facing a backlash from his ow
their say too. >> violence erupting in the streets of egypt and just two days after being hailed as a peacemaker, the egyptian president is being called a different name dictator. >> hitchcock, his movie scared america. now there's a movie that tells his story. all that and so much more on cbs "this morning saturday," saturday, november 24, 2012. >>> good morning welcome to the weekend and welcome to sharyl attkisson filling in for rebecca. great to see you. >> thanks. >> we're very excited to have some special guests this morning in our studio, members of a championship junior high chess team whose story is told in a new documentary called "brooklyn castle." >> let's get to your open story. the death of actor larry hagman. his most famous role was that of j.r. ewing. it was one of the most successful in history. manuel bojorquez is at the south fork ranch which served as j.r.'s television home. good morning. >> reporter: you may recall in the 1980s whenever someone talked about dallas you have to wonder whether they were talking about the tv series or the actua
whereabouts. live in san rafael, elizabeth cook, cbs 5 eyewitness news. >>> the prime minister of egypt will go to gaza in the next few hours. we've just learned that israel is prepared to hold its fire during his visit if the palestinians do the same. this battle between israel and hamas is happening under different circumstances. there is a new government in egypt, one that is generally more supportive of hamas. tonight, hundreds of protesters gathered outside the israeli consulate in san francisco to condemn the israeli attacks on gaza. a handful of pro-israel demonstrators were there as well. cbs 5 reporter allen is in tel aviv. >> reporter: throughout the day, they kept firing rockets back. warning sirens sent civilians screaming for shelters. the tit for tat violence was called a targeted assassination. today more than a thousand people turned out for the funeral and vowed to hit tel aviv in revenge. hundreds of rockets were fired, most of which were intercepted. the rockets are relatively small, but hamas is thought to have as many as 10,000 of them. fire enough and some will get
, egypt today to assist cease-fire talks there. the threat of a ground war remains. thousands of israeli tanks, thousands of israeli tanks, soldiers and rocket launchers are ready to cross the border susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> the israeli air force briefly took control of hamas radio network warning people from gaza to stay away from hamas facilities. >>> president obama is right now in cambodia. he will raise human rights concerns in his meeting today with long-time prime minister han sen. he also visited burma. he encouraged them to continue the transition to democracy. he also met with nobel peace price winner. vice president joe biden says the federal government is in it for the long term when it companies to helping rebuild areas damaged by hurricane sandy. he toured the new jersey storm- ravaged coast yesterday including the boardwalk at seaside heights. the vice president says rebuilding the region is a national responsibility. >>> i know it's monday but we can already start talking the weekend because it starts thursday for some people. >> that's true. i forgot. th
type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war in afghanistan then ther
built in. could that be qatar, turkey? the most likely player would be gypt. egypt. hamas. they have a relationship with israel, a strong relationship egypti with hamas. idea that might mean putting egyptian monitors in, on the idea that the long-range rockets hamas goted. from iran would be removed, no co further shipments would come in be no and there would be no shooting inte there. that would put egypt in a prettypresident mo interesting position. >> considering the new leader is the muslim brotherhood. >> they created hamas. monitor when you look at them as o monitor, that's the trust but trust. verify who do we really trust.egypt but israel has a long-standing s govern relationship with egypt, not this government. that would be a big test for vernment morsi, the morsi government and brother the muslim brotherhood as a broker legitimate broker in the region.nk and i think there's some hope that that could come together. also but also at the same time a lotlot of of discomfort.it. >> john, i'm struck by how much the egyptian president has been resident engaged with
will always do more good than fighting. but i'm very happy to hear that. >> reporter: egypt's new islamist government was the driving force behind the negotiations to end the conflict with diplomatic help from secretary of state hillary clinton. clinton spent two days shuttling between jerusalem, the west bank and cairo. >> people of this region deserve the chance to live free from fear and violence and today's agreement is a step in the right direction. >> reporter: clinton expects egypt to play a key role in maintaining peace. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> two cars riddled with bullets on an east bay freeway shut down the freeway on a heavy commute night last night. they were found near seminary exit westbound 580 in oakland. there was no one in either car. police haven't found anyone related to the cars. the freeway shut down for two hours ars the police were investigating. >>> meanwhile oakland police are investigating a murder that happened about an hour later and a mile away. they were called to hilton street in east oakland about 9:0 last night. a male victim was shot at
pulled back its troops from the border. egypt's new islamic government played a key role in the negotiations with diplomatic help for the united states secretary of state hillary clinton. >> now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike. >> israeli and gaza leaders still have to negotiate a deal though. that would open borders of the blockaded palestinian territory. five israelis and over 160 palestinians were killed during the eight days of attacks. >>> u.n. ambassador susan rice now defending herself in the aftermath of the benghazi attacks. senator john mccain has criticized her for participating in what he describes as a over cover-up. >> this president has and administration have been guilty of cover-up or incompetence. >>> the focus is on rice because she is believed to be the president's first choice to replace secretary of state hillary clinton. some republican senators have vowed to block her nomination. she spoke publicly about t
you overseas where more than 100,000 people in the middle of a very angry political protest in egypt. their demands and concerns about yet another major uprising there. >> talk about another sense of deja vu. wow. >>> also this half hour, a major consumer alert about pork. trusted researchers found a dangerous form of bacteria in the uncooked meat and potential for trouble for your family. it does not end there. so beware what's on the dinner plate, folks. >> just make sure you cook it really good. >>> and later, the massive uproar for producers of the sitcom "two and a half men" after angus t. jones told the public not to woch. so is the show cursed? we'll get to that. >> they've had a rocky 18 months, that's for sure. >> mm-hmm. >>> but first, the clock is ticking down toward tonight's half a billion-dollar power ball lottery. players from california and nevada, which don't have the powerball, have been streaming into the state of arizona. in fact, to buy their tickets. yet another immigration problem for governor brewer in arizona. >> some said they waited in line an hour and a ha
early morning calls today to the leaders of israel and egypt, he has deepened u.s. involvement, sending secretary of state clinton to the region. >> the goal throughout that trip is for everybody to use their influence and their voices to encourage a peaceful outcome. our bottom line is that peace has to include an end of rocket fire that threatens israel. >> reporter: clinton will first go to israel to meet with prime minister netanyahu and then to pal's esestine but will not meet with hamas. very aware of the increasing pressure from congress to cut the more than $1 billion in military aid which the u.s. gives to egypt if they don't cooperate. clinton's message, an escalation of the violence will hurt everyone israeli and palestinians. calm is in everyone's best interest. for sbs"cbs this morning," bill plante in phnom penh. >> the obama administration is warning against making any ground attacks. air attacks continue at this hour. allan pizzey is in tel aviv. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. there are sign that is both sides of the conflict a
. norah and charlie? morsiter evans, thank you. mohamed morsi will speak to the people of egypt today, grantedng why he granted elf almost ast absolute power as the egyptian assembly works on new constitution. holly williams is in cairo this morning where demonstrators have blocked access to the united block embase. >> reporter: this is now a battle of wills between mohamed orsi, egypt's first democratically elected president and his opponents. tahrir square in central cairo, pres rotesters have accused the president of behaving like a areator are camped out. onstrationlanning a demonstration there on saturday. there are fears that could spark spark mlent clashes after an lready tumultuous week. address tmorsi will address the later later on today. so far he is showing no signs of backing do backing down from the expanded new powers he gave himself last week. week. he says he needs those powers to guide guide egypt to a new constitution. the constitution is being drafted by an assembly dominated by president morsi's islamist allies. two more liberal members quit because they said thei
funds. he says he is willing to begin peace negotiations. >> egypt's parliament, dominated by conservative muslims approved a new constitution early this morning. the assembly's more moderate members are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on
.n. secretary- general ban ki-moon is in cairo, egypt today to assist cease-fire talks there. the threat of a ground war remains. thousands of israeli tanks, soldiers and rocket launchers are ready to cross the border awaiting the command. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >> the israeli air force briefly took control of hamas' radio network warning people in gaza to stay away from hamas facilities. >>> president obama is in cambodia now part of his asian tour that included this historic visit to myanmar. earlier today, he is the first u.s. president to visit that country also known as burma currently in the process of transitioning to democracy. he met with a nobel peace prize winner a democracy advocate. >>> 6:06. let's check traffic and weather. it looks like a good week ahead. >> i think it should be a decent week. we have a lot of clouds out there now but it's kept the temperatures mild early on today. no rain yet. but that may change at least in part for the north bay. there's still a slight chance we could see some sprinkles or light showers in that direction but not by much.
for the opportunity to brief you today on my three- day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a signal for the need for international diplomatic mobilization and prevent the further escalation that would put the region at risk. to strengthen the commendable efforts by egypt to reach a cease-fire. i want to welcome the cease- fire announcement. i commend the parties for stepping back from the brink and commend the president of egypt for his exceptional leadership. our focus now must be on ensuring that the ceasefire holds and all those needs in gaza, and there are many, that they receive the aid that they need. as i assure their relief for the as i assure their relief for the people in gaza and israel and in the international community, that the violence is stopping. but we are all aware of the risk, and we are all aware that many de
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)